• Amazing 2400-Year-Old Mask of Greek God Dionysus Found in Turkey

    An almost intact terracotta mask depicting the Greek God of Wine ‘Dionysus’ was discovered on the Acropolis of the ancient city of Daskyleion in Western Turkey (Ancient Greek land) by a team led by Kaan of Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University.  The mask probably dates to the end of the fourth century BC, when, following Alexander the Great’s invasion of the region in 334 B.C., the multicultural city, previously dominated by the Phrygians, Lydians, and Persians, was subject to Greek influence. Dionysus was the patron of theatre and impersonation, in addition to his position as the god of wine and fertility. Masks were traditional components of deity-honoring rituals and were often…

  • 10 Ways You Know You’re Greek

    1.) YOUR NAME DAY IS A BIGGER DEAL THAN YOUR BIRTHDAY…HRONIA POLLA!!! Almost every day of the year is devoted to a Christian saint or martyr, according to Greek Orthodox tradition. When a Greek is named after one of these saints, the saint’s feast day becomes their “name day,” which is celebrated in the same way as a birthday, but even BIGGER in Greece! See Greek Orthodox Name Day Calendar by Greek Boston 2.) YOU WISH EVERYONE A “KALO MINA” (HAPPY MONTH) ON THE FIRST OF EVERY MONTH AND USE THE WORD “KALO” VERY OFTEN. Greeks love to put the word “kalo” or “kali” (which means good) in front of…

  • Dr. Afksendiyos Kalangos Has Saved the Lives of 15,000 Children for Free

    Dr. Afksendiyos Kalangos has had a variety of names in the Greek media. He’s been referred to as “the doctor of the poor,” “a saint without a halo,” “the Greek heart surgeon who rescues children,” “the guardian angel,” and “the doctor with golden hands.” He is the Greek heart surgeon who operated on 15,000 children for free. In 1993, Dr. Kalangos started working as a cardiovascular surgeon at the Geneva Medical School Hospital in Switzerland. The philanthropist doctor launched the “Coeurs Pour Tous” (Hearts for All) foundation in 1998, and the “Kalangos Institution” in 2002, both of which he chairs. Dr. Kalangos has travelled all over the world with his medical team…

  • The beautiful Greek wedding that was in Vogue

      Photos by Amy and Stuart Photography This is the lavish Greek wedding of Greek-American bride, Constance (“Connie”) Peterson and Matthew Pavlovich. Their beautiful wedding is the first Greek Orthodox wedding to ever be featured in Vogue Magazine.  The beautiful bride (Connie) wore a Oscar de La renta dress   On June 4th, 2016, the lovely couple tied the knot. “June weddings have always appealed to me, and I adore peonies,” Connie says. From the beginning, the bride realised she wanted to marry at St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Los Angeles. “Every member of my family has been married in this church, from my grandparents to my parents to…

  • Boiled Greek Coffee May Help You Live Longer…Drink Up!

    Boiled Greek coffee is a staple in every Greek home. Let’s settle an argument that many have first. What came first the chicken or the egg? There are many Turks that claim it’s Turkish coffee, but it’s Greek as many parts of what we call Turkey today were Greek cities from Smirni to Zeugma and more! Even Dr. OZ who has Turkish roots did a TV special on “Greek coffee”! Greek coffee is very healthy for you and tastes great! A groundbreaking new Ikaria study of Vascular Medicine suggests that boiled Greek coffee can increase your longevity and protect against heart disease. Dr. Oz aired a special about what makes…

  • Greek last names that are funny

    Sometimes it can be hard to identify a person as being Greek based on their first name or appearance. I have Greek friends who look nothing like a person born of Mediterranean blood. Some are named Ethan, or Olivia, or Ike, or Nadia, or even Jonathan (like me!). However, one way you can be guaranteed to find out if a person is Greek or not is by finding out their last name. Should it end in an ‘s’ or ‘ou’ then chances are they’re of Greek descent. And here’s another way for you to dig even deeper into their surname to discover exactly where in Greece they’re from… (Most of…

  • Six stereotypes Greeks can’t shake

    Stereotypes aren’t exactly the nicest thing in the world. Most of the time they pertain to something negative about a culture, race, or ethnicity, but there’s the odd time where they can be viewed as funny and/or innocent. The stereotypes that really suck are the ones that derive from a stigma regarding a culture’s past. These are nearly impossible to shake, as a lot of them are deeply embedded in our subconscious thanks to books, what we learned in school, society in general, and different forms of media. Greeks, for one, are not exempt from these labels. We, like every other ethnicity in the world, have been painted with the…

Greek Gateway